Chinese broadcaster censors LGBT symbols at Eurovision

Latest news

    Screenshot of Switzerland's Eurovision performance with a rainbow flag in the audience blurred out and circledImage copyright Mango TV

    The Eurovision Song Contest may be the ultimate in camp spectacle, but for viewers in China some LGBT elements of the singing competition have reportedly been censored.

    Mango TV, which broadcast the semi-final of Eurovision, and is one of China’s most popular TV channels, has come under fire by some on social media for apparently blurring rainbow flags and censoring tattoos.

    According to the state-owned news organisation Global Times, Mango TV also decided not to air performances by Irish or Albanian delegations during Tuesday’s event for various reasons. The second semi-final is on Thursday night.

    The Voice of Homosexuality, a verified account on Chinese social media platform Weibo, shared a number of still images of some of the censored performances.

    Image copyright Weibo

    The account reflected that the broadcaster’s decision to remove references to homosexuality was a “major step backwards” for a network which has previously been more liberal in its approach to the representation of LGBT characters.

    The post points out Mango TV, which was previously know as Hunan TV, broadcasts China’s most popular show, Happy Camp, which has previously starred gay performers.

    You may also like:

    An account with tens of thousands of followers called Global Gay News also posted on Weibo to call the censorship “absurd” and ask “why is the rainbow flag not permitted?”

    Image copyright Hunan TV

    Responding to the post, some Weibo users called for people to “boycott Mango TV,” and one user said they “absolutely won’t be watching Mango TV next month”.

    Others said they were “going to rush out and buy a rainbow umbrella”.

    Weibo users also discussed Mango TV’s decision not to air Ireland’s entry into this year’s competition.

    Ryan O’Shaughnessy will be representing Ireland at the final in Lisbon on Saturday with a song about the end of a relationship. His performance was accompanied by two male dancers.

    Recently there have been moves by the Chinese authorities to restrict the posting of LGBT content on social media, and in 2016 the authorities banned depictions of gay people on television.

    Weibo user Mr Tito shared the full video of the Irish entry, referencing the missing performance on Mango TV.

    Image copyright Weibo

    Mango TV also reportedly did not broadcast the pop-rock performance by Albanian singer Eugent Bushpepa.

    Many Weibo commenter’s suggested censors had taken issue with the exposed tattoos of Bushpepa and his band mates.

    In January, the Chinese authorities took steps to restrict the broadcast of “subculture” elements, which included rules against displaying tattoos on TV.

    Image copyright Thomas Hanses/EBU
    Image caption Eugent Bushpepa performing his song “Mall”
    View the original article: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/blogs-trending-44066237

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/blogs-trending-44066237

    In the same category are

    Brexit: ‘Expectations low’ as PM heads to Brussels Media playback is unsupported on your device Media captionBBC Europe editor Katya Adler looks at how united the EU really is over BrexitTheresa May ...
    US moves to negotiate trade deals with Japan, UK, EU Image copyright Getty Images The US has said it intends to negotiate three separate trade agreements with Japan, the UK and the EU.It could take se...
    Gender Recognition Act: ‘Why we want identity rules changed’ Image copyright Rory Darling If you want to legally change your gender in the UK, first you have to be diagnosed with a mental illness.A transgender...
    ‘I’ve never had this much attention’ Image copyright Getty Images Interviewing Jamie Lee Curtis is almost as terrifying as her new film.The 60-year-old is someone who will give you a to...
    The bang on the head that knocked English out of me Hannah Jenkins speaks English in the morning and German in the afternoon. It's not a routine she chose to adopt - but something her brain requires h...
    Syrian refugee who lives in a historic manor Tamer fled Syria seven years ago because teenage boys in his region were being forced to join the government army. His parents were worried about him ...

    Leave a comment

    Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

    This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.