Google explains how its Chrome ad filter will work

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    If a website doesn’t have the type of ads the Coalition’s testers found especially annoying — such as prestitial ads with countdowns, pop-ups and advertisements that auto-play with sound — it gets a passing grade. Websites that do have them get a Warning, while those that consistently violate the standards and refuse to remove the offending ads get a Failing grade.

    When you visit a visit a URL on Chrome, the browser’s filter cross-references it with the list of websites that failed the Better Ads Standards. If it determines that you are indeed visiting a domain with irritating ads, the filter will check network requests on the page against ad-related URL patterns in order to block those ads. That doesn’t mean it’s taking the right to see those advertisements away from you, though. (Hey, if you like watching full-page video ads that blast music on max volume, then more power to you.) The browser will tell you that it blocked ads on the site, and it will give you the choice to allow them to load whenever you visit.

    This is what that notice will look like on mobile. On desktop, the notification will show up on the address bar.

    Google says that while Chrome’s filter will automatically block ads, its goal isn’t to filter all advertisements all the time. The Chrome team is giving websites 30 days to fix the advertisements that don’t adhere to the Better Ads Standards, and it’s only blocking them if they remain non-compliant even after getting a warning and a month to make things right. By giving them a warning, it’s hoping to convince website owners to remove any intrusive ad themselves. So far, the tech titan’s plan seems to be working: 42 percent of sites that were failing have already resolved their issues and now have passing grades.

    View the original article: https://www.engadget.com/2018/02/14/google-explains-chrome-ad-filter/

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