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The ‘hero’ coach and the other Florida shooting victims

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    Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School Assistant football coach Aaron Feis.Image copyright MS Douglas Football
    Image caption Andrew Feis was hailed as a hero for his actions

    A sports coach at a Florida high school targeted by a mass shooter on Wednesday is being hailed as a hero for shielding students from bullets.

    Aaron Feis, assistant American football coach at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, was fatally injured when he dived in front of a pupil.

    Details of some of the 17 people who died are beginning to emerge.

    Aaron Feis

    The MS Douglas Eagles, the football team at the school, confirmed Mr Feis’s death on Twitter. “He died a hero,” they wrote.

    Head football coach Willis May was told by a student that Mr Feis had jumped between her and the attacker, pushing her through a door to safety.

    Mr May said he had died at about midnight on Wednesday.

    Students led tributes to their former coach as news of his actions and his injuries spread.

    “He was a great guy,” another football player, Gage Gaynor, told local newspaper the Sun-Sentinel.

    “Everyone loved him. Shame he had to go like this. Always gave his all to making us better. Definitely learned a lot from him.”

    Mr Feis also worked as a school security guard. He responded to original calls on walkie-talkies of the attack.

    Mr May, who also carries a radio, said: “I heard Aaron say, ‘No, that is not firecrackers.'”

    “That’s the last I heard of him.”

    Former student Andrew Hoffman, who also recently worked at the high school as a swimming coach, said Mr Feis was “very well dedicated” to safety at the school in his capacity as a security guard.

    Jaime Guttenberg

    Image copyright Jaime Guttenberg/Facebook

    Fred and Jennifer Guttenberg were among those who took to social media to try to locate their missing children on Wednesday night.

    While their son Jesse was able to return home safely, their daughter Jaime was fatally injured.

    Her Facebook page has been turned into a memorial and her father has confirmed her death, thanking people for their messages of support.

    Alyssa Alhadeff

    Image copyright Alyssa Alhadeff

    This photograph of Alyssa Alhadeff and “pop pop” was widely shared on Facebook by her cousin, Melissa Dibble, who appealed for people to help find the missing teenager.

    She later confirmed on her Facebook page that the student had lost her life at the age of 15.

    Another cousin, Ariella Del Quaglio, said her “heart is broken” at the loss.

    More details about the victims will be added to this story as they emerge

    View the original article: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-us-canada-43070359

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-us-canada-43070359

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