Trump Will Withdraw U.S. From Paris Climate Agreement


Mr. Trump said that the United States will immediately “cease all implementation of the nonbinding Paris accord” and what he said were “draconian financial” and other burdens imposed on the country by the accord.

In his remarks, Mr. Trump listed sectors of the United States economy that would suffer lost revenues and jobs if the country remained part of the accord, citing a study — disputed vigorously by environmental groups — that claims the agreement would cost 2.7 million jobs by 2025.

Mr. Obama, in a rare assertion of his political views as a former president, castigated the decision.

“The nations that remain in the Paris Agreement will be the nations that reap the benefits in jobs and industries created,” he said in a statement. “I believe the United States of America should be at the front of the pack. But even in the absence of American leadership; even as this Administration joins a small handful of nations that reject the future; I’m confident that our states, cities, and businesses will step up and do even more to lead the way, and help protect for future generations the one planet we’ve got.”

Interactive Graphic

President Trump will withdraw the United States from the first worldwide deal to address global warming. Where do other countries stand on the agreement?

OPEN Interactive Graphic

Most Republicans applauded the decision.

“I applaud President Trump and his administration for dealing yet another significant blow to the Obama administration’s assault on domestic energy production and jobs,” said Senator Mitch McConnell of Kentucky, the majority leader.

Senator John Barrasso of Wyoming, chairman of the Senate Committee on Environment and Public Works, said, “The Paris climate agreement set unworkable targets that put America at a competitive disadvantage with other countries and would have raised energy costs for working families.”

But Senator Susan Collins, Republican of Maine, tweeted, “Climate change requires a global approach. I’m disappointed in the President’s decision.”

In recent days, Mr. Trump withstood withering criticism from European counterparts who accused him of shirking America’s role as a global leader and America’s responsibility as the world’s second largest emitter of planet-warming greenhouse gasses. And he shrugged aside pleas from executives of the United States’ largest companies, who said the decision will damage the environment and hamper their efforts to compete around the world.

Mr. Trump also found himself at the center of a bruising, monthslong debate inside the White House that pitted senior members of his staff against each other. Some argued to leave the Paris agreement and others insisted that the United States should remain, even as the administration dismantles pollution standards.

The president’s decision was a victory for Stephen K. Bannon, his chief strategist, and Scott Pruitt, his Environmental Protection Agency administrator, both of whom had argued forcefully to abandon the global agreement in favor of a clean break that would clear the way for a new environmental approach.

Other top aides, including Gary D. Cohn, the director of the National Economic Council; the president’s daughter, Ivanka Trump; and his secretary of state, Rex W. Tillerson, had insisted to Mr. Trump that remaining a part of the agreement would have allowed the United States to eviscerate Obama-era climate rules without as much damage to relations with other countries.

After the fierce debate of the past weeks, the White House took on the trappings of a celebration. The Rose Garden was packed with reporters, activists and members of Mr. Trump’s administration, who waited in at the hot sun for the president’s announcement. Scores of staff members lined the sides of the Rose Garden as a military band played soft jazz.

Supporters of the Paris agreements reacted with pent-up alarm, condemning the administration for shortsightedness about the planet and a reckless willingness to shatter longstanding diplomatic relationships.

“This is disgraceful,” said Annie Leonard, Greenpeace USA’s executive director. “By withdrawing from the Paris Climate Agreement, the Trump administration has turned America from a global climate leader into a global climate deadbeat.”

The United States has emitted more planet-warming carbon dioxide into the atmosphere than any other country. Now it is walking back a promise to lower emissions.

Kierán Suckling, executive director of the Center for Biological Diversity, said, “Trump just confirmed his total contempt for our planet’s future,” condemning “this reckless rejection of international climate cooperation” that was “turning our country into a rogue nation.”

Corporate leaders also condemned Mr. Trump’s action. In a statement on its website, I.B.M. reaffirmed its support for the Paris agreement and took issue with the president’s contention that it is a bad deal for American workers and the American economy.

“This agreement requires all participating countries to put forward their best efforts on climate change as determined by each country,” the company said in the statement. “IBM believes that it is easier to lead outcomes by being at the table, as a participant in the agreement, rather than from outside it.”

Jeff Immelt, chairman and chief executive of General Electric, took to Twitter to say he was “disappointed with today’s decision on the Paris Agreement. Climate change is real. Industry must now lead and not depend on government.”

But Mr. Trump was resolute.

“It is time to put Youngstown, Ohio, Detroit, Mich., and Pittsburgh, Pa., along with many, many other locations within our great country before Paris, France,” he said. “It is time to make America great again.”

Pittsburgh Mayor Bill Peduto responded on Twitter, “I can assure you that we will follow the guidelines of the Paris Agreement for our people, our economy & future.”

View the original article: https://www.nytimes.com/2017/06/01/climate/trump-paris-climate-agreement.html?partner=rss&emc=rss

Continue reading the main story

In the same category are

Trump Comments on Race Open Breach With C.E.O.s, Military and G.O.P. Five armed services chiefs — of the Army, the Air Force, the Navy, the Marines and the National Guard Bureau — posted statements on social media conde...
News Analysis: Unlike His Predecessors, Trump Steps Back From a Moral Judgment “There are a lot of killers,” Mr. Trump said to Bill O’Reilly on Fox News early this year when he was asked about his reluctance to condemn the Russia...
One Theory Over Meaning of Trump’s ‘Many Sides’ Remark “They think there were 300 or so racists who showed up to a rally, and who got exactly what they wanted: Violence, and violence in a way that inspires...
News Analysis: Trump Threats Are Wild Card in Showdown With North Korea “On the U.S. side, the tradition has been steely resolve and preparation,” said Dennis C. Blair, a retired admiral and head of the United States Pacif...
Right and Left on the North Korean Nuclear Threat Mr. Lipson explains that Mr. Tillerson’s seeming contradiction of President Trump’s alarmist talk is not a sign that the White House is in “disarray.”...
Trump Plans to Declare Opioid Epidemic a National Emergency Photo President Trump, with Vice President Mike Pence, spoke Thursday outside his golf club in Bedminster, N.J. Credit Al Drago for The New York Times...

Dont forget to “Like” us on Facebook


Need something to share, visit our sister site for the

‘News in the last 30 days”

in a clear concise package ….

 

If you are an artist or interested in art, visit our art website and read about todays artscene and browse some of our artist profiles

 

Comment on this story