US Congress passes spending bill to end brief shutdown

Latest news

    Rand Paul made a move to block the budget bill on Thursday night over objections to what it will do to the US deficit. [Alex Wong/Getty Images/AFP]

    A brief US government shutdown is expected to end early on Friday after Congress passed a funding bill that will keep the government open through March 23.

    The legislation will now go to President Donald Trump, who is expected to sign it before the start of the working day, ending the country’s second shutdown this year. 

    The House narrowly passed the bill, 240-186, after the Senate approved it earlier on Friday. 

    The hours-long shutdown began after midnight on Thursday when the current government funding expired. 

    It came after Republican Senator Rand Paul delayed the Senate vote over his objections to the massive budget measure, which lifts spending caps on US defence and domestic programmes by about $300bn. It also raises the government’s debt ceiling until March 2019.

    Paul told the Senate that the bill, which would raise the deficit, is the “definition of hypocrisy” and that it would “loot the treasury”.

    “I ran for office because I was very critical of [former] President [Barack] Obama’s trillion-dollar deficits,” Paul said.

    The Republican senator did vote for a landmark tax overhaul bill in December that would add nearly $1.5 trillion to the national debt over 10 years.

    Despite Paul’s objections, the Senate passed the bill shortly after 1:00am local time (6:00 GMT) on Friday, sending it to the House where it took about three hours to approve. 

    No deal on DACA

    This was the second time this year that the government shut down. In January, members of Congress failed to reach a deal on immigration, which Democrats had initially said would need to be part of any spending agreement.

    On Wednesday, Democratic House minority leader Nancy Pelosi, spoke for a record eight hours on the House floor, calling for a permanent measure that protects the nearly 800,000 undocumented people, known as “Dreamers”, who were brought to the US as children.

    In September of last year, Trump announced he was ending the Deferred Action on Childhood Arrival (DACA) programme, giving Congress until March 5 to come up with a permanent solution. 

    The budget agreement “does not have my support, nor does it have the support of a large number of members of our caucus,” Pelosi said, as reported by the Associated Press earlier this week. 

    View the original article: http://www.aljazeera.com/news/2018/02/government-shuts-time-year-180209061220906.html

    Senate Republicans have vowed to hold a debate on immigration later this month, but Dreamers and their supporters worry a solution will not be found before the March 5 deadline.

    In the same category are

    Tanzania: Abducted tycoon Mohammed Dewji returns home Tanzanian tycoon Mohammed Dewji, who was kidnapped a week ago in Tanzania's economic capital Dar es Salam, has returned home unharmed. Dubbed as Afri...
    Indians protest after train accident kills dozens Angry relatives staged a protest on Saturday on the tracks where a speeding train ran into crowds celebrating a Hindu festival, killing around 60 peop...
    Five things you should know about the US progressive surge Protests enveloped Washington, DC and other cities, where the streets teemed with hundreds of thousands of demonstrators on January 20, 2017, when Don...
    Bolsonaro continues to lead polls despite fake news scandal Sao Paulo - Brazil's turbulent election enters its final phase with far-right candidate Jair Bolsonaro poised for victory amid a high profile fake-new...
    Khashoggi case: What’s next for Saudi Arabia’s economic dream? Editor's note: This show was recorded shortly before Saudi Arabia confirmed Khashoggi's death. The killing of Saudi journalist Jamal Khashoggi at his ...
    Understanding Afghanistan’s elections 2018 Afghanistan headed to the polls on October 20 to vote for its third parliament since the country's new constitution was adopted in 2004. It hasn't bee...

    Leave a comment

    Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

    This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.